Categories
Album album concept album review Art Culture Entertainment Favourites Life music music album music artist music review news Opinion Pop Music Review Tame Impala UK Music

The Magic of Tame Impala: The Slow Rush

Flawless in creation, The Slow Rush is an episodic concept that draws on temporal themes of the unending cycle of life.

Similar to that of a slow rush in itself, we seemingly crash through our lifetimes – without actually having a sense of feeling about them at all.

I felt like I heard Tame Impala’s deep dive of The Slow Rush for the first time, in a fever dream. More so a surreal escapist than that of your generic music artist, it is no wonder his ravenous audience is lapping up every morsel Tame Impala (Kevin Parker) gives us to consume.

After all, we hadn’t spoken about Tame Impala (Kevin Parker) elusive acts of music since his commercial corner of Currents. That was back in 2015. 2020, and we have the return of said fever dream with The Slow Rush 5 years later.

Drawing on ideas witnessing your own lifetime whizzing by in a mere lightning bolt, The Slow Rush is a piece of work that praises the unending cycle of life. This unending – and simply unnatural feeling – is ever-present in its song names too, as it draws on elements of oxymorons with Instant Destiny, Tomorrow’s Dust and Lost in Yesterday, that as phrases, give you no feeling of resolve or – dare I say it – a formative ending. The album concept name itself Slow Rush, gives us an impression of these temporal themes, perceiving the problematic feeling of rushing our passage of time without actually feeling it at all.

The album even ends on Parker longing for One More Hour – despite seemingly wasting his time, as he originally requested a longer duration of time at the beginning of the album with One More Year. This emphatic illustration draws on us as humans to unduly ask for more and more time – despite already having it.

But, of course we come to the eventual realisation about it all with, Is it True and It Might Be Time – with Parker reciting, “something doesn’t feel right” when we do realise it is our time to eventually face the music.

With that said, Tame Impala’s ebbings and flowings of creating stills in music has been prevalent since his first experiment with InnerSpeaker in 2010. Giving the music project name of Tame Impala, insinuating that it is indeed a band behind the music, Parker’s approach to psychedelia, dystopia and surrealism has reached the breaking point of the genre we know it as, “psychedelic rock”, and ultimately smashed Parker’s music into a genre of its own.

Despite the disjointed efforts of Parker recording one half of the album in Los Angeles and his own home studio in Fremantle, Australia, the album concept is anything but. The Slow Rush just adds to the ever-existing beauty that fulfils Parker’s music already.

Categories
Album album review Art artist cleopatrick Culture Entertainment Favourites Life Listening Music live music music music artist Music Blogger Music Playlist music review news Opinion Review Rock Music Rock Playlist Royal Blood UK Music

Artist Spotlight: cleopatrick

____________________________

New rife rock middle-ages mafia.

____________________________

Fresh, bold and stark-raving mad, cleopatrick are a worthy accompaniment to murder.

Not a murder in the ordinary sense of the word, no. The murder of a genre we once knew as rock – a genre which had become far too complacent with the drip-tap of pop trickling through its cracks. The Ontario best-buddies hard rock duo are becoming the known from the unknown with their blistering slap-in-the-face boom that makes Royal Blood‘s new music work of Limbo sound like a pansy. Although dressed as the fashionable duo – similar to those as Royal Blood and the White Stripes – their music has a beautiful sense of youth, hostility and freshness that we’ve not really heard before.

Hoping to collate their work into a debut album this year – rather than the feral singles we’ve received so far – they’ve forewarned us not only to watch this space, but to start chipping away their mark within the rock halls of fame too, as they’ll soon be entering them.

Anarchic favourite hometown, explosive GOOD GRIEF, shrill-thriller of youth and doom-and-gloomy sanjake, top the bill of the band’s extent to writing future-cult classics – and we can only imagine there’s room for more.

Rock duo have known each other since they were 4.

More importantly, they have shown us they can’t just create quick-biters worthy of four minutes or so – but can create the dirty lingering types, too. Divining inspiration from the likes of Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes, belly button blues is an instant favourite that tops the lot for me.

_________________________

My friends are wasted
And I don’t even care
I’m in my basement
Texting girls that aren’t even real
My youth is gone and I know it

_________________________

youth, cleopatrick

After hearing their most recent, THE DRAKE, which was released in early March this year, we can certainly expect their debut in the coming months – especially after picking up so much traction after their first EP via “14” in 2016.

Pulled straight from the archives of an old hometown gig they played, THE DRAKE‘s official video perfectly showcases the rampant display of their telling of a high-school bully story.

It’s all quiet in the cleopatrick camp for now … but we’ll hear the notorious thumps de thumps soon I’m sure.

Keep up to date with Cleopatrick HERE

Categories
Album album concept album review Art artist Culture Entertainment Favourites Kings of Leon Listening Music live music music music album music artist music industry music review news Opinion Review Rock Music Spotify

Kings of Leon – ‘When You See Yourself’ Album Review

Tennessee-bred quartet draw up eighth studio album that replaces swagger for subtlety that strengthens over time.

Reprising their roles as emphatic titans in the rock music industry, they have returned from their 2016 album, WALLS with their eighth release, When You See Yourself in early March of 2021. With less temper and angst to it than most other records compared to Find Me and Waste a Moment on their previous, it is ultimately fashioned with progressive playing, delicate sentiment and glossy productive finish.

Unfortunately – while this record is a blissful listen – it carries itself with not a lot of substance. Whilst dirty guitar hooks are present in pre-single, The Bandit and halfway-down-the-list Stormy Weather, the album soon becomes lost in itself and an intermingling of songs folding into one another seems to happen. For a while, while listening to this album, I did seem to forget where I was, who I was listening to and would often take a step back and play the record again. Nevertheless, it is still a confident and mature direction from the rock quartet that no doubt stamps their mark on their triumphs they have had throughout the years they’ve been active.

____________________________

For Kings of Leon, their legacy drives a hard bargain and majorly wins over your opinion for such a delicate studio album.

While it does seem to lose itself on rare occasions, it is a blissful listen with its glossy textures, playful guitar song-writing and exact ambiguity that was present on some of their first records like Because of the Times and Come Around Sundown.

Favourites from the 11-track selection include When You See Yourself, Are You Far Away, A Wave and Golden Restless Age.

Categories
Album album concept album review Art artist Culture drumming drums Entertainment Favourites Foo Fighters live music music music artist music industry music memories music review Rock Music Royal Blood Song UK Music

Let’s Talk: What’s your most treasured music memory?

Happy weekend, folks. With the first day of Spring finally upon us, I’d thought we’d all take a trip down to memory lane, and discuss our most treasured memories in the world of music.

Live or recording – what’s the best memory in music you hold? The one you hold dear – or simply just a fond tale of your past experience?

Let me know.

With me suffering hideously with hay fever today – so fittingly on the first day of Spring, too – let’s gloss over the fact that music and it’s beautiful moments won’t be til after Summer this year, and talk about what we miss about the most, and what we have loved along the way.

I’d have to say my most treasured music memory is witnessing the rock legends, Foo Fighters live at the National Bowl in Milton Keynes, UK. I remember as if it were yesterday – a year prior to when I was set to be whisked off to University in 2016, we spent one final piss-up with some lads from back home, paying a fitting tribute to Grohl and co, Royal Blood and naked-drunk music icon, Iggy Pop. Yet, this gig was simply one-of-a-kind, because we saw Grohl in a way that no one would ever see again.

After recovering from breaking his leg in Sweden earlier that year, Grohl was – rather fittingly – occupying a “rock throne,” marked up with guitar necks and luminous beauty. Despite not having the same energy and give Grohl would often given if he was his own two feet, it was still a sight to see – a moment that would be short-lived as he would recover just the year after.

Bellowing out rock classics amidst of crowd of thousands – with vivid detail of what those porta-loos looked like – whilst the sun in the shire of Buckingham settled down for the night, was and still is, one of those that will stay with me forever. It will stay with me too, especially since I saved the very ticket and wristband that got me into the gig in the first place.

Right, I think that’s me done. What about you lot?

Do let me know your most treasured moment of music in the comments below – I’d love to hear them!

Categories
Album Art Culture Entertainment Favourites Listening Music live music music music album music artist music industry Music Playlist Opinion Rock Rock Music Rock Playlist Song Spotify support music

I made a playlist: Trainwreck Rock

You lovely lot wanted it, so here it is. In a new series I’m calling – I made a playlist – we go through each playlist drawn up, and best of all, make it a collaborative work space, so you can add your own personal vibes to it, too!

For the pissed-off playlist that will channel your rage, your inner rock demon – this playlist is for you.

A concoction of pent-up guitar trashing and manic drum-bashing, the playlist of Trainwreck is simply dressed here to impress. Some of my favourites in the rock, alternative rock, classical rock and metal world all blended in a cacophony of sheer panic and noise. What’s not to love, eh? Give it a listen below on one of your angry walks, a family dispute or when you simply don’t give a f*ck anymore.

As ever, get a feel for the playlist and do with it as you wish – add, chop or change? It’s all yours.