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Creeper – “American Noir”: EP Review

Sex death voids abound, illustrious English quarter of – – –

C R E E P E R are making their Vampire-Slayer-esque debut with American Noir.

Ditching their safe rock passages of discussing typical conversations like sex and death, they face an existential crisis of the ages with their operatic-rock filth gorging on the delights of human sacrifices. This is American Noir. A stockpile of rock ballads – eclipsed with sorrowful tales amongst mourning those already dead – is Creeper’s iconic sound that has amassed an engorged following, eager and sprightly to catch up on anything they release as a band.

Midnight plays a track with oozy synth slides chilling piano accompaniment, a worthy soundscape echoing the halls of a stoic castle, while Ghosts of Cavalry draws on the scope of Scorpion, One of Us is a bittersweet epiphany-symphony piece sharing the love amongst those misfits once lost (Born in the shadows/To die in the dust/Not like the others/You’re one of us) that really channels in Creeper‘s creativity here.

Their art always trail-blazes the elaborate theatrics of amnesty and solidarity, and this EP collection is no different. With the songs perceived as misfits in their own right from their previous anthemic Sex, Death and the Infinite Void (2020), they fit together like clock cogs and lubricates the machine once more for a seamless transition into the work of Creeper.

Imposed more as an EP – with its sombre running time of 15 minutes throughout – it is nonetheless a compelling and contexual chapter that is worthy of its place among life … and death.

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BRIT AWARDS 2022 PERFORMERS ANNOUNCED

The set of artists for this years’ Brit Awards has been announced ahead of the scheduled date of 8th Feb at The O2.

The likes of Liam Gallagher, Ed Sheeran, Holly Humberstone and Doja Cat are among the performers on the night.

Amongst a few big yawns, it will be yet another night of hopeful celebrations of the best of British music – all of the British music that is simply mainstream, mind. You’ve all heard my thoughts on award shows so this is not the time or place for that extensive argument, but still.

It will be interesting to note how upcoming music artists are going to be reflected and of course, those all important amendments to male/female artists categories that will no doubt spark up controversy … with people that doesn’t affect at all! I think if it makes the artists more comfortable reprising their roles in the music industry, then I’m all for it! I was this close to purchasing pre-sale tickets but at £80 a pop at The O2, I didn’t think it was necessarily worth the ticket price considering the line-up stacks and the typical stigma of award ceremonies … !

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The Wombats: “Fix Yourself, Not The World” – Album Review

After finding renowned TikTok success, The Wombats find new form in their Talking Heads-esque style of modern music – without the album being “too pandemic-y.”

Reflecting modestly on the horrors of the past few years in regards to COVID-19, the trio of Matthew Murphy, Tord Øverland Knudsen, and Dan Haggis wanted to keep the bold and fun of Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life interloped with the fragile and fragmented of self-reflection … and the hopes of seeing those lights at the end of the dark, long tunnel.

Murph’s zany lyrics are here in their comfortable masses (“Don’t wanna be talking to myself in a supermarket/Watching myself sink into a carpet somewhere/Don’t wanna end up there”) and truly incorporate an expertly-built album that encompasses new sounds of highs and lows fitted into a Wombat wonder that we’ve all grown accustomed to over the years.

Ever since they shared their love of Joy Division and ultimately forgetting the irony over ten years ago, The Wombats have become a musical – and cultural – phenomenon to the world of indie and rock abound. In the time that an unknown remix of Greek Tragedy came one of those re-used songs used by millions on TikTok, their following and listens skyrocketed and resulted in a profound reflection on their chaotic journey to achieving international fame.

Their fifth instalment is a true telling of captivating songwriting, modest musical moments and a band that are well and truly in the element. With a pre-tour to boot with more to come in the Summer, it will be a year for the ages.

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New Year, New Music: What’s in Store for Music in 2022?

As we bypass the festivities of Christmas and chart a course to New Years, it is ample opportunity to think ahead into the new year of 2022 and see where we are at with music and our industry.

WITH NFTS AND TIKTOK ABOUND in amenities and rife pipelines for artist directory and workflow, live music will plan a course back to its 2019 numbers and regain momentum again as we ramp up to the summer season with festivals stretching far and wide across the UK.

With uncertainty among variants emerging in the winter months, time will tell if Glastonbury is going to be held this time at Worthy Farm. With Glastonbury emerging as a necessary funding asset to the funds of our industry and our artists – aswell as our worthy charities, many are hoping that the festivals alike will return next Summer.

As more and more licensing deals are made and more and more artists begin to sell their catalogues in one swift swoop, would you hedge a guess that they know something that us as the general public do not?

If it’s any year to take the plunge and strive forward with your music, it’s this one. With prevalent artists like Arctic Monkeys and Machine Gun Kelly confirming a return to form – but no date set – we look to those artists that should really be on your radar come the first quarter of 2022:

Audacious indie-rock trio of The Wombats return with their sickle album, Fix Yourself, Not The World in January. The likes of Band of Horses and Billy Talent follow shortly after with Things Are Great and Crisis of Faith respectively. Bastille bring up the rear leading the forefront of a electro-synth wave pop cacophony with Give Me The Future and Korn’s Requiem sees the hard metal eyeglass in February. For fans alike, Alt-J‘s The Dream and Frank Turner‘s FTHC sees excitement build as the three-year hiatus for both artists come to a wonderful end.

As we enter the Spring season of March, we see familiar favourites with The Stereophonics and Bryan Adams rekindling old flames and charting history into another year of music. April comes and go with Jack White’s Fear of the Dawn and Bloc Party’s Alpha Games, while we start to see the list become shorter and shorter as we near the start of Summer. Undecided and unannounced, there is certainly more to come that we’ve been waiting for from our favourites. Including Liam Gallagher’s third studio work with C’mon You Know in May.

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Let me know what you’re looking forward to most in 2022!

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Travis Travesty: Industry Mourns over Astroworld Festival Horror

The music industry has entered a state of instant shock as we mourn the passing of 8 avid concertgoers of Travis Scott’s annual festival, Astroworld.

Amongst a live gig stricken with grief, panic and turmoil, the international rapper has come under fire again for his controversial antagonising of the crowd to “start riots” and surge in waves – which was the unfortunate after-effects of what occurred on the 5th of November.

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“It ain’t a mosh pit if there no injuries / I got ’em stage divin’ out the nosebleeds” – STARGAZING, Astroworld, 2018

With lyrics like these imprinted in the very songs included in Astroworld song list, Travis’s active curation for the “rage” atmosphere is undeniably too far merely for a live music concert. It is interesting to note that the “nosebleeds” he refers to here considered to be the most elevated seats in a stadium, which are called “the nose bleed sections.” His fans jump from “the nosebleeds” and injure themselves, causing literal nose bleeds. And we ask ourselves, how do these things happen?

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Since the travesty that night, both Travis Scott and Drake have been sued over the deadly US festival crush, simply for being irresponsible and merely ignoring the rampant cries of the crowd urging him to stop the performance.

“Defendants failed to properly plan and conduct the concert in a safe manner.”

But, among many others, this is not the first time such an incident has occurred when it comes to Travis Scott and his live gigs. Where warning signs were ignored from previous accidents – including a paralyzed fan urged to jump from a balcony – many questions are being directed to those event organisers that let this happen again.

When the promo video from previous years is used to hype chaos itself, is it any wonder these things occur so predominantly among his fans?