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Is Fave the Future of our Music Fandom Engagement?

In the topical news of the day, we’ve started to become aware with a new super-fan app: FAVE.

Simply put, it allows you to connect with your fan community, purchase merchandise and engage with fellow fanatics in an-all-one system that is dedicated to the passionate fans.

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Although more for those young and heroic fans of pop superstars, it allows a safe online haven for the fandoms and their creativity – often where other sites fail to do so.

With that said, it seems that some of the biggest pop artists in the past decade are joining. Smooth-as-silk funkadelic guru of Bruno Mars joins the ever-growing list of BTS Army and Taylor Swift fans (aptly named “Swifties“) as Fave starts to gain traction.

Personally, I feel that both TikTok and Fave will become a fantastic brother-sister app connectivity that work within one another to bring about mass change to the music industry and its corresponding social media. Or is it just another way for the real crazies to talk to each other?

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What are you thinkin’ about this one?

Let me know your thoughts!

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Ed Sheeran: Is = Worth it?

It’s been a week since Sheeran’s fifth album, = and despite topping the charts with another Number One album of his, … but is it a worthy addition to his collection of mathematical symbols?

Since his adolescent debut of + way back in 2010, Sheeran has become a quintessential pop legend throughout the decade. But as he began to shift away from his true acoustic-folk works to the more chart-topping arena pop anthems, many people feel that he has become to lose his way, and ultimately sell himself to the mass public of the music industry. Whether that may be true or not, Ed Sheeran’s recent album falls short of the mark in every sense of the word for me.

Flush with the plasticity of pop – from Shivers to Bad Habits – the album feels boyish, lazy and oddly rushed from a production perspective. The slow, emotive moves of Love in Slow Motion and Visiting Hours seem like favourable works that begin to save the album from its brink, but the lazy fillers of Sandman and Be Right Now choke any desire for this album to reflect any songwriting with depth.

Whether it was the fatherhood break that threatened his retirement from the love of music – or the fact that he was taking a break from songwriting itself – the change in Divide to Equals is somewhat devastating.

I totally understand the desire to change your creativity avenues all to make adventurous music that you have never attempted before, but I really do miss the authentic and enriching style of + for his debut. Whether that was because it was at the start of his career and the fame and adoration was not all that present at that moment in time, we’ll never know.

Still, we’ll always have those albums to cherish. He’ll do whatever he loves to do. He’s the biggest music artist in the world after all.

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World of Music Licensing: Field Visit to London

Trepidation, fascination and in-depth insight, field visits for work within the realms of music licensing is certainly no easy feat – but they are exciting.

By fully understanding who we’re working with as venue owners, what we’re working with in terms of venue scale, allocation of music events and spaces, it is a marvellous idea to visit venues in-person. Not only for maximum efficiency in terms of client reports but maximum accuracy in terms of music licensing the venue to the best of our knowledge. All because we’ve seen the venue with our own eyes!

Quite simply, it puts a face, a name and an icon to the black and white data-entry accounts. Above all, it makes it personal, natural and far more enjoyable enjoyable in terms of what we do for music licensing – which really, is all about for the working musician.

For my first field trip as a Live Music New Business Advisor, it was extremely insightful. When we travelled past Knebworth and it’s mighty park – which was put on the map from Oasis’s iconic performance in ‘96 – before we headed into Central London, I knew I would be in for a treat. If such a staple in musical history is dotted just outside the capital of London, what cultural significance is tucked away in the centre of the capital?

First, we headed down within the shadow of the Shard via Amazing Grace, a newly refurbished church-now-turned bar nightclub, it had all the qualities of a fantastic and elusive venue for underplays and musical vibes perfect for a relaxing Friday evening. After that swell visit and a talk with the owners about everything to do with the music licence, we swiftly headed west to Hammersmith. An often quaint but equally illustrious as the glorious amphitheatre of Apollo greets you in the vast stretch of culture, as you step out of the underground station. At Hammersmith, we had the privilege of attending a tour at one Riverside Studios, a circular space for multi-art performances, theatre shows, cinema screenings and a magnitude of musical events. First popularised for its feature filming of Doctor Who during the first couple of series (and the use of stage doors as the noise for EXTERMINATE) it is now a Jack-of-all-trades swivelling circus of party tricks. If you’re around London between Christmas and New Year, I recommend diving in to check out the 360 AllStars variety show they have coming in.

Grabbing a mocha to go, we headed back to the realms of underground during dreaded rush hour. Fortunately, with working from home a viable option for many commuters, it didn’t necessarily seem that bad for a Friday.

Now here I am, lodging notes in my phone as the train heads back to familiar territory. My familiar territory.

It would be an advantageous decision to do more field visits in the future. Covering the scope of the UK, live music new business is ripe for the taking. Especially after the horrors of a pandemic, the opportunity for growth in live music and the entertainment sector is colossal. With ample drip-feedings being delivered from the Government, establishing the premise of music licensing via a friendly face is all-the-more-important for maximum efficiency and accuracy in today’s current industry.

More to come I hope. As always, thanks London.

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Artist Spotlight: Plini

As prestigious from his masterclasses to his independency in artistry and musicianship, Plini is one artist who is a devoted forward-thinker and has created a magnificent blend of instrumental progressive rock.

All hand-crafted and recorded from his own bedroom studio.

FIRST THOUGHTS

Truth be told, instrumental prog rock is never a genre I have tapped into almost entirely during a music session. But, holy hell. What an artist to discover this genre. A mind-bending genre in its own right.

Beautifully harmonic, illustrious in creativity and composure, Plini is a mastermind on the guitar.

Using oh, so many strings and no headstock allowing you as a musician to manipulate its work that little bit more, his craft is a complex cavity of musical brilliance that is flawless and – hard to grasp when you realise its just one Australian fella behind it all.

LISTEN

You can have a listen to his EP from last year named, Impulse Voices below. This most recent display of work shows off the sunset offerings of I’ll Tell You Someday and The Glass Bead Game. Going back further, is the witnessing of 2016’s EP of Handmade Cities. An album that is far more contemplative and reserved than his follow-up, it features Electric Sunrise and Every Piece Matters.

Even if you were not an avid investor of progressive rock similar to myself, I implore you to have a listen. …Even if it’s just for a couple?

Handmade Cities:

Impulse Voices:

For something extra, witness Plini’s mindset as he takes a walkthrough of his song, Pan.

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Glass Animals: DREAMLAND

Diverse, enriching with emotional depth and vision,  Glass Animals are insidiously addictive.

Music of familiarity and family, ample Glass Animals are nurturing into the lores of psyechedlic electronic pop, as they bring music to the new modern age.

With the creation of Dreamland, it is another twist in the tale as their subtle sounds enter uncharted territory. 2014’s ZABA, 2016’s How To Be A Human Being and now we have Dreamland in 2020.