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Adele and The Vinyl Delay: What’s the Problem?

Ever since Ed Sheeran spoke about him having to push his new album out quicker because of Adele booking every vinyl factory for her release of ’30’ this week, there has been a huge delay in production getting shifted out of the factory gates. But it’s not solely Adele’s fault.

The huge waiting times for vinyl production – and music production in general – is due to the fact that since the pandemic struck our industry, every avid musician and producer out there is making albums between the dates of September 2021 to 2022. With no avenues to tour and no discernible income from new, hot records – the time to push is now. With record labels setting high standards of lead times and deadlines, it’s come at a cost of getting the music to the consumers.

The real problem lies why this is a real issue. We wouldn’t have to necessarily rely on the manufacturing of vinyls if vinyls weren’t the only thing musicians relied on to earn any aspect of money. Therein lies the problem – the monetisation of the music industry.

If it weren’t for the hideous regimes of streaming services providing ill-health to the pockets of the musicians, the only real way of earning any equivocal value is via merchandise and vinyls (and cassettes, for some.)

It seems that the exponential growth of vinyls since the pandemic has caused the huge spikes in new vinyl releases, classic legacy albums and remastered editions to peak in production and value.

Whether or not this will be subside is another question. One thing is for sure though – this will continue long into next year. The resolution is the issues of music streaming, and certainly not those within the vinyl factories. Where are you at with this one? Let me know your thoughts!

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Your Next Artist: Too Many Zooz

An origin story for the ages. A cacophony of interloping saxophones, trumpets and low bass growls of whatever else. A perfect audio salad.

Derived from the hustle of bustle of New York’s subways busking to the delights of the uninterested congregation of the capitals’ inhabitants and commuters, Too Many Zooz bring a phenomena to the world of music that is nothing but a joyous occasion to get involved with.

Essentially, they smash alternatives of jazz, funk, Afro-cuban rhythms and EDM house music to bring a new eclectic style of the weird and wonderful. Refreshingly chaotic, they have trawled from the steeples of New York’s subway system to the glorious ground-level venues across a tour of Europe in May 2022.

With this tour, comes a huge following of admiration and fanatic frenzy ever since they first uploaded to the world of YouTube. Charting millions of views with their brazen public performances, they are certainly a force to be reckoned with – and it looks like they have no intention of slowing down anytime soon.

Escapades of Warriors, Pink Yesterday and Subway Gawdz bring with it a crisis on our hands. Why on Gods green Earth is there no other bands like this? Thank God for Too Many Zooz.

So. damn. fun.

http://toomanyzooz.com/

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Your Autumn Playlist: ‘Delta’ by Mumford & Sons

Good evening, folks. Here’s hoping you had a good weekend and anticipating yourself for a good week ahead.

As we say goodbye to Summer and enter a new season into the fold with Autumn, we start to look for warm nights in with candles and scents of cinnamon not too far away from us. With cosy nights in, comes cosy music playlists to enjoy.

One familiar artist – one familiar album, mind – I’ve been delving into a lot during pumpkin spice season is the work of Mumford & Sons and their most recent release in 2018 named, Delta.

Their warm fusion of bluegrass and anthemic pop/folk is a perfect soundscape for those moments by the fire, and there is no better warmth that than of Delta.

Irrespective of the stigma such a band gets, you cannot deny their inescapable attitude to creating fantastic feel-good moments with their music.

Have a wee listen during tonight if you a moment to spare …

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Lorde – “Solar Power’ Album Review

Trawling from the back of her sombre tellings of Melodrama back in 2017, sultry soprano superstar Lorde returns with her critically acclaimed brazen-faced album of Solar Power.

Although cheeky at times, it’s remarkably soulful.

Embracing like the warmth of a sun and relaxing like that of a smooth timbre, Lorde encapsulates a summer of love and friendship. Self-titled, Solar Power and Stoned at the Nail Salon portray a rich reimagining of lyricism and clever portrayals of summer anthems that enter familiar waters of how summer anthems often go.

_______

Welcome to sadness
The temperature is unbearable until you face it
Thank you for flying with Strange Airlines
I will be your tour guide today
Your emotional baggage can be picked up at carousel number 2
Please be careful so that it doesn’t fall onto someone you love
When we’ve reached your final destination
I will leave you to it
You’ll be fine

Secrets from a Girl (Who’s Seen it All) Lorde

_________

Shedding away the electronic trails of her past works, Lorde becomes more within herself as it features far familiar stripped-back acoustic works of her embellished song-writing, that has been adored ever since she graced us with Royals back in 2013.

Although sounding oddly repetitive at times with the same rhythms coming from the drum kit, the songs are sultry and relaxing enough to get lost in it – all in one big song.

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Best British Artists: Voted by YOU

So, I finally managed to get around to tallying up the votes from my blog post about finding the best British artist (according to my amazing readers world-abound) – and you can have a look at the numbers below. Out of 50 comments received, these were the results!

<Also have a gander at my favourite bloggers’ playlist, which denotes all her favourite British artists in one handy collection. Thanks Catnip!>

THE RESULTS

DISCLOSURE: the results of this voting may bear down to listener preference, taste, demographic and influences.

Elton John, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Dire Straits and Pet Shop Boys all gathered in FOUR votes apiece, resulting in 18 votes overall for this as the TOP FIVE BEST BRITISH ACTS/ARTISTS. There’s some artists that are simply expected to top the lost, but it was surprising for me to see Elton John top the list too, but I’ve never been one to dabble into his music, so there you are.

These pioneers are shortly followed up with Pink Floyd, Black Sabbath, Queen and The Rolling Stones with THREE votes apiece, resulting in a total of 12 votes for the second list of artists who made the cut. With me being a massive Queen fan, it was disappointing not to see them earn more votes in the long run, but I’m pleased all the same that they were mentioned ample times.

Entering the territory of those artist underdogs or under-appreciated artists, we have: The Who, The Cranberries, The Smiths, U2, Kate Bush, The Kinks, Massive Attack and Duran Duran and rather surprisingly, Fine Young Cannibals. These artists clocked up TWO votes apiece, with resulting in 16 votes in total. While The Smiths somehow outmanoeuvre their Manchester counterparts of Blur and Oasis to earn more votes, the overwhelming appearance of Fine Young Cannibals solidifies my need to have a listen to their music catalogue as I am not aware of them as an artists, as much as I’d like to be.

The final recommendations come with earning ONE vote apiece, resulting in 17 votes in total. Bearing in no particular order: The Cure, Blur, Simply Red, Ed Sheeran, Amy Winehouse, Jess Glynne, Adele, John Newman, Rudimental, Sex Pistols, Talking Heads, Tears For Fears, PJ Harvey, Joy Division, New Order, Duran Duran, Electric Light Orchestra, Judas Priest and Def Leppard.

What’s missing?

While this is a highly commendable line-up with some fantastic music artists involved, many aren’t mentioned at all. Britpop giants, Oasis, Leicester local-lads Kasabian and fanatic funks of The Police were all missed out. But this is the use of saying such a thing like the Best of something, which usually refers to us thinking about the classic artists from back in the day, rather than the present ones we see and hear today in “popular”music.

1.

ELTON JOHN

THE BEATLES

LED ZEPPELIN

DIRE STRAITS

PET SHOP BOYS