I’M ADDICTED TO ROCK ‘N’ ROLL// Another Friday brings an eclectic mix of brazen optimism, fiery rock anthems and non-plussed instrumentals to bring in the weekend.

The Reytons.//

What’s Rock and Roll?

A nationally renowned rabble-rouser collective from hometown heroes in Southern Yorkshire is no easy feat. Yet, The Reytons have done it. With their fast indie-rock lashings, cock-sure musicality and frenetic tribalism to their live shows, they are a true rock ‘n’ roll force. A smashing debut of Kids Off The Estate in 2021, has brought them a copious follow-up with the same unadulterated swagger. The aptly named, What’s Rock and Roll? is fired by the contempt shown to the industrialist industry and aided by the sprawling mass of loyal fans brought from Yorkshire, aswell as the rest of the UK – as each touring show brings a sold out pre-warning. Cash In Hand & Fake IDs is every bit AM’s Fake Tales of San Francisco as it is a charming monologue of the compartmentalising the true nature and nurture of British culture. Underneath the Turner-bravado, comes a blanket of creature comforts that’s every bit colloquial, sure. But with it, brings a bequeathed shine of frontal force of explosive rock – that just tries to be exactly that. “They say the apple don’t fall far from the tree / It’s all cash in hand and fake ID’s / And he will be late tonight / They don’t kick out ’til half past three / But he’s found the one so she drinks for free / But he won’t get laid tonight.” What’s Rock and Roll, I hear them ask? In that blistering 12-track memento, I think you’ll find the answer yourself.

The Murder Capital.//

Gigi’s Recovery

Another day, another post-punk spirit hailing from Dublin. Joining an ever-growing roster in the world of the curious alternative, The Murder Capital are a sprawling outfit destined for greatness. This year? This year, sees the group push themselves into bolder sonic territories with their highly-anticipated follow-up Gigi’s Recovery.A decamping in London brought about a lush and loose “concept record.” A slow-burning album with an exposed narrative seeping throughout, it’s still able to capture the dark depravities of the post-punk workings out, all the while returning to a place of grounded strength. You can read the full review HERE.

boygenius.//

The Record (releases March 2023)

With the new year, brings in some fantastic news for the swooning charm of hits different. Boygenius is an American indie rock supergroup formed in 2018 by Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus. Their self-titled debut EP was written and recorded at Sound City Studios in Los Angeles, waaay back in 2018. Now? Now, they’re back with their announced debut studio album, The Record, with a release date at the end of March. That may seem a too long a gap, considering it’s been a lengthy one already between EP and album, but fear not – the trio have kept her interests peaked with three tracks released. Hitting the 12 minute mark, $20, Emily I’m Sorry and True Blue bring a sparkle of, lonesome wanderlust-indie: a staple of all three female singer-songwriters’ works. If you’re going to create beautiful music in the industry, why not do it together? About a love that kinda gets you lost, lucrative stand-out Emily I’m Sorry brings with it, a mighty, mighty tag. How boygenius became the World’s Most Exciting Supergroup.

Måneskin.//

Rush!

I’M ADDICTED TO ROCK ‘N’ ROLL.

Keeping up with their illustrious 15-minutes of fame – which usually, wanes out by now – Måneskin have brought together a compelling argument stating that their rock propriety is very much warranted. The argument, named Rush!, is a cash-grab collective of doozy hard rock riffs and dance-pop rhetorics that results in the band being ticked in neither boxes. The guttural GASOLINE is a dance anthem; shaken in with FEEL, which is every bit a funky pop iteration of UK’s Franz Ferdinand. The shake-downs of Morello’s GOSSIP and MAMMAMIA bring the edge enough for it to appear like a hard rock album from the sidelines. Even neurotic BLA BLA BLA is a pure Eurovision staple, BABY SAID offers the best choral feed and even the genuinely beautiful IF NOT FOR YOU is a welcomed change of pace. But that said, the Italian ZITTI E BUONI still offers their greatest escapade of substance – the song that resulted them in winning Eurovision in the first place.

No doubt though, Rush! – whether it’s a coherent mesh of unadulterated bouts of seedy sexuality and staccato distortion – the people behind who made it sounds like they’re having the best time of their lives. No doubt too. After winning Eurovision in 2021, no one would’ve guessed what was to follow: a support slot with Rolling Stones; collaboration with Iggy Pop; the list goes on. The list long enough, mind, for them to turn down a slot at Reading + Leeds in the UK for a MVT VMA appearance, scooping up an award for best alternative video. Whatever boat you find yourself in for Måneskin, you can’t argue the shake-up the four-piece have caused (now newlyweds, my compliments), their seemingly distorted sound and edgy glam flare-ups are bringing “rock ‘n’ roll” to international charts. Even despite Supermodel trying too hard to remind us of Smells Like Teen Spirit. But, Cobain ripped off Killing Joke so all’s fair game I think.

An explosive flurry of sexy is always good when it comes to rock – legends of the game have been doing it for years after all – and Rush! is no different. Frontman Damiano blurts out “I’m addicted to rock ‘n’ roll” in KOOL KIDS and if this 17-track demolisher is anything to go by, I believe him.

We Are Scientists.//

Lobes

Enter the world of We Are Scientists. An inaugural synth-alternative pop medley of catchy melodies, high-octane guitar trills and booming bass-lines. The American rock duo have always had a following in the U.K. With their array of post-punk revival and part-indie rock with a glint of ’80s synth pop, they drew comparisons with the likes of Editors and Franz Ferdinand. Especially after Nobody Move, Nobody Get Hurt dropped in late ’05. Now after their contemporary efforts of Huffy in 2021, they are back with a declaration of a new album set to be released on the 20th Jan: Lobes. A world utterly unknowable among the many, it sparks ambiguity and assertive sci-fi concoctions, especially with the drives of synth waves used throughout. Lobes sees the fateful return of a melancholic edge to their works; a true companion to those late night drives to the sandy dunes of well…nowhere. You keep on saying that you don’t get the joke / So why the hell are you laughing? / I could explain, but you prefer that I don’t / At least I got a reaction.

Mac DeMarco.//

Five Easy Hot Dogs

Five Easy Hot Dogs comes as Mac’s second instrumental album. A fitting backdrop to picking up your latte; the clean-lined, lo-fi minimalist approach is actually a direct pledge DeMarco made “not go home to Los Angeles until I was done with a record,” on a spontaneous solo road trip. Much like the undulating loiter of endless road passages, Five Easy Hot Dogs is a stagnant repository of creating an album for the sake of creating, just because well, you can. Despite it’s feedback as a vein of something else, Hot Dogs is a surprising easy-listen. Carried through the spidery acoustics of Portland 2, interlaced with the hip guava of Chicago, it embraces inner cities as it maps out a sound bite for each. Much like the opposite end-goal of an American road trip, it’s not something to get lost in.

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