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Creeper – “American Noir”: EP Review

Sex death voids abound, illustrious English quarter of – – –

C R E E P E R are making their Vampire-Slayer-esque debut with American Noir.

Ditching their safe rock passages of discussing typical conversations like sex and death, they face an existential crisis of the ages with their operatic-rock filth gorging on the delights of human sacrifices. This is American Noir. A stockpile of rock ballads – eclipsed with sorrowful tales amongst mourning those already dead – is Creeper’s iconic sound that has amassed an engorged following, eager and sprightly to catch up on anything they release as a band.

Midnight plays a track with oozy synth slides chilling piano accompaniment, a worthy soundscape echoing the halls of a stoic castle, while Ghosts of Cavalry draws on the scope of Scorpion, One of Us is a bittersweet epiphany-symphony piece sharing the love amongst those misfits once lost (Born in the shadows/To die in the dust/Not like the others/You’re one of us) that really channels in Creeper‘s creativity here.

Their art always trail-blazes the elaborate theatrics of amnesty and solidarity, and this EP collection is no different. With the songs perceived as misfits in their own right from their previous anthemic Sex, Death and the Infinite Void (2020), they fit together like clock cogs and lubricates the machine once more for a seamless transition into the work of Creeper.

Imposed more as an EP – with its sombre running time of 15 minutes throughout – it is nonetheless a compelling and contexual chapter that is worthy of its place among life … and death.

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january, let’s have ya: A Playlist for those Blues

We’ve almost made it. The January blues is almost over with us entering halfway through the final week of January. The forbidden fruit within the calendar year. Post-Christmas sadness with the season weather being just as unforgiving, we need a music artist to take January with a pinch of salt and to accept our fall from graces.

Lo-fi. The aim of the game is Lo-fi. More specifically, 5 hours runtime of the most relaxing, soothing and elusive tones that those bedroom artists can create with nothing but a drum board and a couple of sultry samples. Interloping unknown words of jazzhop and chillhop – that frankly becomes unprecedented to discuss such genres that exist – creates a megamix of both originals and covers that soothes both the mind and body when you’re either de-stressing over financial runnings all day or simply snuggling up with a good book in your cushty apartment as the outside chill looks far less desirable.

If you wish to enter the lands of sonder like me, have a listen to the below playlist:

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Your Record of the Weekend: ‘New England’ – Kid Kapichi, Bob Vylan

Explosive exploits and fractured societies, New England is the new angsty social commentary piece on a country devoid of change – and simple change at that.

Amongst the hypocritical self-centred nature of the country (Come witness the greatness of Britain / Diving around in a German car / Stop for lunch in a sushi bar) to the habitants’ inability to discuss change (Social change, no I don’t want that/Just sitting eating crisps in my one-bed apartment) and finally dropping to the lows of the weakened democracy under our rule, (That’s why I keep voting for the rich and heartless/Bored of all these moaning artists/So I’ll cast my vote regardless) it is an emphatic, raucous wall of insatiable angry noise that depicts a country in need of mending.

Of course, both Kid Kapichi and the feature artist of Bob Vylan are no strangers to creating politically-inducing music. With both Working Man’s Town and England’s Ending trawling through the streets of a social discussion of corruption. New England is their first – and probably not the last – collaboration venting their frustrations through the power of raw, indignant vocals and the whiplashing of instrumentals to boot. Worth a listen.

____________

You’re such a fool, Britannia
Britannia fooled again
Britannia, you’re so vain
You’ve gone insane

‘Cause you’ve been fooled, Britannia
Britannia fooled again
Britannia, you’re so strange
You’ve gone insane

_______________

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The Wombats: “Fix Yourself, Not The World” – Album Review

After finding renowned TikTok success, The Wombats find new form in their Talking Heads-esque style of modern music – without the album being “too pandemic-y.”

Reflecting modestly on the horrors of the past few years in regards to COVID-19, the trio of Matthew Murphy, Tord Øverland Knudsen, and Dan Haggis wanted to keep the bold and fun of Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life interloped with the fragile and fragmented of self-reflection … and the hopes of seeing those lights at the end of the dark, long tunnel.

Murph’s zany lyrics are here in their comfortable masses (“Don’t wanna be talking to myself in a supermarket/Watching myself sink into a carpet somewhere/Don’t wanna end up there”) and truly incorporate an expertly-built album that encompasses new sounds of highs and lows fitted into a Wombat wonder that we’ve all grown accustomed to over the years.

Ever since they shared their love of Joy Division and ultimately forgetting the irony over ten years ago, The Wombats have become a musical – and cultural – phenomenon to the world of indie and rock abound. In the time that an unknown remix of Greek Tragedy came one of those re-used songs used by millions on TikTok, their following and listens skyrocketed and resulted in a profound reflection on their chaotic journey to achieving international fame.

Their fifth instalment is a true telling of captivating songwriting, modest musical moments and a band that are well and truly in the element. With a pre-tour to boot with more to come in the Summer, it will be a year for the ages.

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Muse’s Return to the Realm of Simulating Black Holes: “Won’t Stand Down”

In a return after a 3-year hiatus from 2018’s Simulation Theory, Bellamy and co are back with dark and dominant passenger of Won’t Stand Down. Facing adversity with strength, it’s a call-to-arms against all the bullies in life and really sets the boundaries in the direction of where Muse are set to go with their ninth album – yet declared or confirmed as of yet. You can view it below:

Let me know your thoughts … !