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… it’s all thanks to ‘Stranger Things’: How Important is TV Culture to our Music?

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The Duffer Brothers’ critically acclaimed supernatural thriller Stranger Things is both a cultural phenomenon and an act of TV magic. Now in its fourth season, the momentum certainly hasn’t lapsed or faltered since its first episode date back in 2016, despite what the latest critics are telling you.

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Set in 1980s Indiana, it’s not without its hip and now-trendy nostalgic references to tabletop role-playing games or eclectic pop artistry, either. A montage deluge swamped with sci-fi, fantasy, horror and the supernatural, it is a VHS delight for those who grew up in the 80s and for those who wished they grew up in the 80s. Not shy of its movie and TV references, it is also known to dabble into a trope of iconic soundscapes plucked straight from the era.

Since its release to our screens this weekend, another momentous occasion in music has taken place.

This year, Stranger Things put Kate Bush’s 1985 hit Running Up That Hill (A Deal With God) straight to Number One in the charts after a scene featured the song at a swelling moment during the fourth series. A song far too familiar with its use within popular culture references, Running Up That Hill – one of Bush’s most popular songs of the 80’s – which can be seen on her iconic Hounds of Love album, is an ethereal complement to Max’s storyline in the series.

Nostalgia is a running trend right now, and Stranger Things, a series directly plucked from the 80s, is certainly no stranger to it. Interloped with a die-hard audience of adolescent teens, will undoubtedly bring back the past of evocative music to the present, as another context brings a whole new meaning to music.

Fantastic stuff.

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