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Broken Record Campaign: How Artists and Songwriters get “Stiffed” by the System

We call on Government to help us #FixStreaming and keep music alive.

Another day, another petition.

A petition calling for signatures and its affiliated campaign has been raised calling on the music industry to change. More specifically, how it sorts out its streaming.

Initially founded by PRS For Music Director, Tom Gray back in April, the ‘Broken Record’ campaign is a strong-willed effort to not only fix the way streaming works out its royalties and payments to musicians but also has similar interests within the current climate of keeping music alive and active within our lifestyle.

How do both artists and songwriters get stiffed by the system? Each get approximately $7 out of every $100. Whoop-de-doo! While $30 goes to the streaming services. Tone-deaf. Hilarious. Tragic.”

Tom Gray, 27 Aug, via Twitter

No doubt, this campaign has come with immediate backlash to how Spotify rewards its artists and musicians. As well as not fairly compensating their musicians on the platform, but it has also come to light that the way they pay their musicians is from one big pot.

Right now, if you are an average consumer of music, most of your subscription streaming fee is *not* going to the music that you listen to. It is going to music that you may not even like or, indeed, approve of.”

Tom Gray, 31 Aug, via Twitter

So, regardless if you listen to your favourite local artists in your area non-stop for a week, you would still be paying for Drake’s bills – because it all comes from the same place. Of course, with Drake drawing in 60 million listeners per month, this comes as no surprise as to why Spotify would do it this way. But it’s still completely unethical, inconsiderate to those less fortunate and simply wrong. Streaming needs to be fixed.

As of the 23rd of August, Musicians Union confirmed that over 16,000 people have now signed the petition calling on the Government for an urgent review of streaming.

Given the amount of money generated by the streaming of music – especially now during this pandemic and the apparent halt of live music gigs and performances – songwriters, composers and performers shouldn’t have to rely on Government support, and shouldn’t be struggling to survive.

But they are.

Spotify pay £7 to music and keep £3. To get your £7 to go *solely* to your music, you have to listen at least 1400 tracks per month. Which, from Spotify statistics, appears to be significantly more than double average listening habits, closer to triple in fact.”

Tom Gray, 30 Aug, via Twitter

The way Spotify pay their musicians and artists needs to change. From unruly split cuts to improper guiding to those musicians who receive less monthly listeners than those that do, there is over 16,000 people that wish to #FixStreaming.

Since the live music industry is faltering as it is, streaming services need to be able to do more to provide to those who are faltering too.

But, is this a fair argument or is a witch hunt?

With many consumers not being able to afford individual music catalogues though and streaming offering that convenience to consumers all in one site, who will listen to a system that works so well that brings in millions to the industry, labels and all?

Wishing to find out more and how YOU can get involved to provide support? Click below to find out more and read on …

By manvmusic

In one of the most controversial, ever-changing and unpredictable industries, join my rants and ravings as I dissect the music industry word by word through technology, current events, industry stories and problems.

One reply on “Broken Record Campaign: How Artists and Songwriters get “Stiffed” by the System”

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