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Adele ’30’: Album Review

After an excruciating wait …

the definitive voice of heartbreak returns.

That’s right. Adele is back. With the album portraying an emotive struggle as she stands at the ultimate cross-roads, the new sounds of Adele is fresh, immersive and simply brilliant. Becoming written gospel at this point, it’s classic Adele at its best.

There is certainly some elements in this album that may come as a surprise to some, however. With angelic triumph of Easy On Me acting somewhat of a red herring, it sees Adele branching out to new sounds. With the distorted magic of Cry Your Heart Out and the funk-edge of Can I Get It many may see it as tonic Adele-brilliance, while others may seem it as fusion confusion. The classic Adele-prowess we’ve all grown to love from the Tottenham singer is rawer here though, with these broader sounds coming to the frame. Where she may have been accused in the past for playing it safe, all genre inspirations are on show here. The bold and brash is ultimately bolstered more-so with its gospel and string arrangements that make it such a pleasure to listen to.

For me, it’s a fantastically fresh and superbly simple on making music. Turns out that yet again, all you need to make compelling music is a piano arrangement – accompanied with an astounding voice.

Although the album is being received with mixed results, I think it’s a great idea to switch up the scene and flip the excepted into something new. It shouldn’t be written in her career to always make Rolling In The Deep-etiquette. She was only 21 when she wrote that after all.

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Adele and The Vinyl Delay: What’s the Problem?

Ever since Ed Sheeran spoke about him having to push his new album out quicker because of Adele booking every vinyl factory for her release of ’30’ this week, there has been a huge delay in production getting shifted out of the factory gates. But it’s not solely Adele’s fault.

The huge waiting times for vinyl production – and music production in general – is due to the fact that since the pandemic struck our industry, every avid musician and producer out there is making albums between the dates of September 2021 to 2022. With no avenues to tour and no discernible income from new, hot records – the time to push is now. With record labels setting high standards of lead times and deadlines, it’s come at a cost of getting the music to the consumers.

The real problem lies why this is a real issue. We wouldn’t have to necessarily rely on the manufacturing of vinyls if vinyls weren’t the only thing musicians relied on to earn any aspect of money. Therein lies the problem – the monetisation of the music industry.

If it weren’t for the hideous regimes of streaming services providing ill-health to the pockets of the musicians, the only real way of earning any equivocal value is via merchandise and vinyls (and cassettes, for some.)

It seems that the exponential growth of vinyls since the pandemic has caused the huge spikes in new vinyl releases, classic legacy albums and remastered editions to peak in production and value.

Whether or not this will be subside is another question. One thing is for sure though – this will continue long into next year. The resolution is the issues of music streaming, and certainly not those within the vinyl factories. Where are you at with this one? Let me know your thoughts!

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MANCHESTER SOUNDS OF THE CITY 2022: Pixies to headline city concert

https://www.festicket.com/festivals/sounds-of-the-city/2022/shop/

With tickets set to go on Friday, will you be in the queue for the weekend? It is worth mentioning that the slow readers club and klangstof are among the support acts. In what may be one of the only available major UK concert date for 2022, it may be a wise choice to pluck out your tickets when you get a chance, if you wish to see the alternative-rock collective from Massachusetts.

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Is Fave the Future of our Music Fandom Engagement?

In the topical news of the day, we’ve started to become aware with a new super-fan app: FAVE.

Simply put, it allows you to connect with your fan community, purchase merchandise and engage with fellow fanatics in an-all-one system that is dedicated to the passionate fans.

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Although more for those young and heroic fans of pop superstars, it allows a safe online haven for the fandoms and their creativity – often where other sites fail to do so.

With that said, it seems that some of the biggest pop artists in the past decade are joining. Smooth-as-silk funkadelic guru of Bruno Mars joins the ever-growing list of BTS Army and Taylor Swift fans (aptly named “Swifties“) as Fave starts to gain traction.

Personally, I feel that both TikTok and Fave will become a fantastic brother-sister app connectivity that work within one another to bring about mass change to the music industry and its corresponding social media. Or is it just another way for the real crazies to talk to each other?

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What are you thinkin’ about this one?

Let me know your thoughts!

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IDLES – “CRAWLER” Album Review

The fourth studio release sees IDLES in a brand new texture – with all the colours we’ve come to love already.

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With a striving lunge forward, CRAWLER strives for a stronger indulgence of reflection. It hones in on a more inclusive approach to delivering songs with moments of interlacing beauty and anger within one another.

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IDLES have never been one to take a step back and reflect on their angsty actions – especially from that of an idled punk band. But ever since frontman Talbot left therapy, he realised he was angry at all the wrong people. Since then, he has been able to create more thought-provoking dramatic ballads that certainly have more depth and feel to them. Forerunner pre-single, The Beachland Ballroom is a prime example of this. Understanding where they are as a band – rather than running through the motions and living in it – they’ve been able to create an album with vivid stories, wild imagination and a sense of escapism into their ever-fixing worlds.

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“It was writing selflessly that helped make it possible. Reflecting. Telling my own story. Not trying to tell everyone else’s story. Not trying to fix the world – just talking about how I am fixing mine.” -Joe Talbot

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Although not featuring the usual raucous rock anthems that shake the walls like we saw in Ultra Mono, it is a refreshing texture to a band that seemed far too brazen-faced to change. It puts the band in a better – and far stronger – place as a sharply-dressed outfit in the world of punk rock music.

You can catch IDLES perform their fourth album works as they strive for a mega UK/Ireland tour in January 2022.