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GRAMMYs 2021: Do the Grammys Matter?

As they snub favourite artists such as The Weeknd and Kendrick Lamar from their acclaimed prizes, sift through the mud of allegations from racism, sexism and a lack in diversity to artist picks – it shows just how unfit they are as judges to music.

With the Grammys receiving such a subjective onslaught each year and as interest rates fall on their overall importance as awards, do the Grammys even matter anymore?

Short answer simply is: no.

Unlike the Oscars, the prestigious academy award for music has seemingly lost its original tact, and is out of touch with the rest of the world. Unlike the Oscars that actually awards films based on glowing prospects, reputations and sheer camera-rolling etiquette, The Grammys is a congruent cess-pit of odd nominations, shameless bigotry and is showing a side to the music industry that is rather ugly.

With so many prestigious and culturally-defining artists in the industry that have been snubbed of such an award (Queen, Bjork, ABBA and Jimi Hendrix to name a few) it is easy to understand why The Grammys has been scrutinised for their lack of desire to produce a decent academy award show to celebrate the best of music – as they choose to instead award their “white friends and counterparts” in the industry – and receive backlash of racism and bigotry because of it – and not the distinctive artists that have made a impact against the status quo of the industry.

Because if they start awarding acts who go against the “system” of upending gender stereotypes (Queen) and make albums that go against their specified genre (The Weeknd) what does that say about the system of the industry itself? Something that cannot be controlled it seems …

But its important to note that something like the Grammys is not so definitely clean-cut like other competitions like the Olympics. When it comes to who sang the most impressive or made a defining moment to the world of music, well then, that becomes a bit more objective. With it, comes the usual backlash and sparks of fury as such an award because it is such an opinionated sport.

But to me, I think this is what makes Grammys not matter most, because at the end of it all, while it is fun to see who will win a Grammy, it ultimately doesn’t affect how we (me included) view an artists’ work. When we listen to a piece of work, do we define how “good” it is if it won a Grammy? No, we think it’s good because it’s simply good music. For me, they are not one and the same.

So with that being said, I think that the sheer novelty of awarding music based on something so objective certainly makes it an easier target than most other award shows. But, let’s be honest, they haven’t helped themselves in the past, have they?

Let me know what you think to this topic of conversation – and more importantly, will you be watching tonight?

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Former suspended CEO stating on how ‘rigged’ the ceremony is …

Grammy’s controversial moments show just how implausible it is as an awards ceremony …

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Quote of the Day: What is Music to you?

“If anything at all, music is the soundtrack of your life. Music are those memories that stay with you within the verses. Simply put, the only truth in it all is the music. You can’t lie with music – it’s all there, laid out for all to see. Music is a unity for us all to embrace.

A hundred people can relate to a song a million different ways – and we can all still sing it and relate to one another. Whether that be one’s living room or in a summers’ field, music joins us together and makes us whole.

Down for a cry? Down for a laugh? Stick some of your faves and go either way with it.”

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Let’s Talk: Is Rock Dead?

KISS bassist, Gene Simmons has been in the firing line, as he stated that “rock is dead” and informed us to “don’t kid yourself” about it either.

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“The reason for that is not because there’s a lack of talent, but because young folks, that kid living in his mom’s basement, decided one day that he didn’t want to pay for music. He wanted to download and file share.

“And that’s what killed the chances for the next generation of great bands. The fact that the music was for free. So nowadays new bands don’t have a chance.”

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We had the mighty rock greats of The Beatles, The Stones, Pink Floyd and Elvis. Then, the heavier metal side, you had the likes of Metallica, Maiden, AC/DC and on and on. With a refusal to place rock legends, Foo Fighters in the same bracket, is rock as dead as believe it to be? After all, who is the next Beatles?

Is Simmons right here? There is such a strong sentiment in the fact that the business model has shifted, which does have a knock-on effect to how we see and view rock music nowadays. The short of it all, we’ve gone soft. With it, goes our rock music.

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“Don’t kid yourself. As soon as those girls [Foo Fighters] are gonna grow a little bit older, that’s going to go away. It’s like sugar: you taste it, it gives you that little energy boost, and then it’s gone forever and you don’t care.”

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The desire to play music is slimming as each day passes where music became more expansive, more accessible and free. Above all else, the desire to provide your own spin for music and its rock elements ultimately vanished when we were struck with bedroom artists.

Let me know your thoughts with this one and if you really believe that rock is dead.

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Are Spotify Taking Over The World?

In an elegant rebuttal to their neighbouring competitors, Spotify have declared their plans for world domination within the music industry via their On Stream event.

What are they planning by 2025?

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1. Market Expansion: they plan to expand to 80 new markets – resulting in more than 1 billion Spotify users

2. Spotify and Social Media: they plan to include Spotify ‘clips’- which will harness social media and music consumption into one app.

3. Visual with Audio: they plan to include visual content when we listen to our music; including music videos and the visual side of podcasts. This will undoubtedly cause competition between themselves and YouTube.

4. Artists Marketing: in an attempt to earn more money, Spotify are also planning and providing marketing strategies for artists and labels to feature more prominently on playlists and next shuffle songs. The more you spend, the more you feature, right?

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What does this mean for artists and consumers?

With the fact that Spotify royalty payments do not pay artists enough – a fact that was glossed over this charade – is their response to it? Artists having to pay for listens? It seems that Spotify are planning to be on the same par as the conglomerates of Facebook and Instagram, with the features of social media, the use of marketing yourself as an artist distributor and the use of social media via ‘clips’, promoting a stronger desire to not only play music and listen to podcasts, but to do everything else we do on the Internet, too. All via one company.

Soon they won’t have to rely on others for the sharing of our stories, eh?

Cornering the market and becoming the number one streaming service, is certainly a clever idea and would undoubtedly increase their worldwide profits. The evils within Spotify are gleaming with glee at this prospect. And as ever, the creators who make the industry – who actually power Spotify to keep trudging on – are kept at the bottom of the pile again.

But, will these plans in place spark change and:

provide greater chances for artists to make a name for themselves in an ever-growing and ever-consumed industry?

What are your thoughts on this one?

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Let’s Talk: Are Music Albums Dead?

With streaming services providing 40,000 singles each day, the pressure to stand out is overwhelming – and it seems that albums are not part of the plan for the future in the industry.

But the way we consume music has changed. And changes everyday.

With our attention spans shrinking to the same as a fish, music has become more consumption-based as opposed to a more musicality-based concept. For avid listeners to return, singles are being the dominant force – and albums? Albums are being left in the dark. Now, albums are merely littered with fillers, covering a mediocre concept story for the explosive single that carries the whole damn thing. There is always a certain song that someone skips or a certain part of the album that they miss completely.

Personally, I enjoy the whole listening of the album, it makes the music present itself in a different light, bringing up new concepts, ideas and feelings to the music – where you may not have if you listened to the single on its own. After all, there is a reason why those concept albums from the likes of Pink Floyd and The Beatles are some of the most loved albums in the past decade. There is a reason to play the whole thing. The beauty of an unrefined, raw album where the songs slot beautifully against one another. I guess it’s a bit like listening to Audible.

So, let’s talk. Will albums ever return or will they remain a distant past as singles consume us?