Categories
Album album concept album review Art artist Blogger Thoughts Chart Music Commentary Culture Ed Sheeran Entertainment music music album Music Blogger Pop Music thoughts UK festivals UK Music Vinyl Wordpress World Music Writing music

Ed Sheeran: Is = Worth it?

It’s been a week since Sheeran’s fifth album, = and despite topping the charts with another Number One album of his, … but is it a worthy addition to his collection of mathematical symbols?

Since his adolescent debut of + way back in 2010, Sheeran has become a quintessential pop legend throughout the decade. But as he began to shift away from his true acoustic-folk works to the more chart-topping arena pop anthems, many people feel that he has become to lose his way, and ultimately sell himself to the mass public of the music industry. Whether that may be true or not, Ed Sheeran’s recent album falls short of the mark in every sense of the word for me.

Flush with the plasticity of pop – from Shivers to Bad Habits – the album feels boyish, lazy and oddly rushed from a production perspective. The slow, emotive moves of Love in Slow Motion and Visiting Hours seem like favourable works that begin to save the album from its brink, but the lazy fillers of Sandman and Be Right Now choke any desire for this album to reflect any songwriting with depth.

Whether it was the fatherhood break that threatened his retirement from the love of music – or the fact that he was taking a break from songwriting itself – the change in Divide to Equals is somewhat devastating.

I totally understand the desire to change your creativity avenues all to make adventurous music that you have never attempted before, but I really do miss the authentic and enriching style of + for his debut. Whether that was because it was at the start of his career and the fame and adoration was not all that present at that moment in time, we’ll never know.

Still, we’ll always have those albums to cherish. He’ll do whatever he loves to do. He’s the biggest music artist in the world after all.

Categories
album review Alternative Rock Art artist Blog Blogger Thoughts Commentary Culture Entertainment Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes hard rock IDLES music Music Blogger music industry new music Pop-punk Punk Rock Rock Music Rock Playlist UK festivals UK Music

Frank Carter & The Rattlesnakes: ‘Sticky’ Album Review

Unapologetically chaotic, ‘Sticky‘ is a pressure release sharing talks on the dirty and the depraved during lockdown.

With accommodating – and somewhat feral – guests, enter Frank’s town … if you dare.

Carter and Co are back with their fourth studio album out of the door. Where their last album, End of Suffering was an outcry to mental health and toxic masculinity, this one is more of the good ol’ punk classic of f*ck you and everyone around you. In other words, it’s a fantastic familiarity from this echoic band.

Among Bona fide – and soon-to-be- punk icons of Primal Scream’s Bobby Gillespie, IDLES’ Joe Talbot and electro-punk rapper Lynks, we are slowly entering territory of raw, unequivocal talent as Your Town and Go Get A Tattoo become album highlights championing diversity of rock and slab-stone punk.

This album is just as raw as any – as any IDLES and SLAVES album before them or since. Certainly standing on the shoulders of their punk adversaries, Frank Carter and the Rattlesnakes are paving their own journey.

___________

My town, it looks like yours
Run down, worn out, all shut doors
Broken windows, empty halls
Where no one gives a fuck at all

___________

[Note: It’s important to note that during this music video, Frank Carter and Dean Richardson are seen throwing away their prior album End of Suffering. Has the suffering started all over again? Or is it case of simply being fed up with it all and anarchy being the only solution?}