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Jamie Cullum: Profession of Jazz

Upending the notions of jazz, Jamie Cullum is the splash of colour that redefined the world of melodic pop.

Surly vocals and elaborate chops on the keys, Cullum has achieved critical acclaim for his vibrant mix of originality. His depth of character is fully flourished in his music too, with his ability to swoon us with emphatic ballads to witty pop in a matter of song listings. Cullum first broke into the scene back in 2002 with Pointless Nostalgic and 2003’s Twentysomething. Dazzled with classic retellings of jazz classics and emotional originals that slotted beautifully within each, Twentysomething broke the foundations of the complexity of jazz and Cullum became a household name over night.

His complexion to intermingle within genres didn’t stop there though. Cullum subsequently released Catching Tales in 2005 and The Pursuit in 2009, which embraced his soft rock – pop progressive ballads and careened beautiful showings of his songwriting material with bold-and-brash Get Your Way, witty ramblings of Nothing I Do, and of course, sombre ballad retellings with Love Ain’t Gonna Let You Down.

For fans of both enjoyable soft pop work and the establishment of jazz with orchestral styles, Jamie Cullum is a singer-songwriter for the ages. His most recent release in 2o19, Taller, established Jamie’s talents and allowed him to break the top ten in record sales. My favourites from this record have to be the fancy-and-fast of Usher and the enchanting dazzle of Marlon Brando, that is seen to be on the B Side for this one.

Prolific in sound, voice and immense piano chops, Jamie Cullum is a redefining motion in the industry.

Cullum ultimately cements himself further as a music anomaly every new record he releases.

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I made a playlist: Pop Romantics

I had to do it. There’s something so stereotypical and predictable about the shrewd and twangy of pop romanticising about emotion, heartbreak and lust. And I love it.

So, in true fashion accommodating to the popular, I made a playlist returns with a Pop Romantics playlist for you. Whether you’re an individual in heartbreak, in a friendship wishing for something more, or in an amazing relationship with someone you hold dearly in your life, Pop Romantics is perfect for you. It’s perfect because everyone has experienced their fair share of love, right?

Get emotional below. Let me know your fantasy favourites or ones you intend to avoid.

20 songs. 1 hour. 1 big romance.

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My Blogger Thoughts …

It’s been a hell of a week so far, and so instead of investing some time into a written discussion, I’ve decided to just share with you some of my thoughts today.

I’ve learned the hard way that running a blog upholding producing daily content is not easy work. Not only drawing up inspirational words of wisdom for blog ideas but also investing time in sharing it within your own community and fellow bloggers, it really takes it out of you and before you know it – the morning has gone, your coffee has gone cold and your stomach is rumbling for a sandwich at a 2 ‘o’ clock shadow.

I’ve tried unconditional ways of staying ahead of the game, raising audience awareness, running the numbers – all seem far too difficult to run it constantly for a month straight, say. I’ve even tried to write blogs a week in advance – but that majorly runs you dry with lack of original concepts and ideas for content; especially when I would like to stay within the confines of the music and its industry.

Whilst my writing has gotten quicker and my ideas are spent less time in my head per se, keeping up to date with a daily blog is still a pretty difficult challenge to uphold. I certainly wouldn’t want to reduce its quality for quantity over the day, that’s for sure.

Any perspective thoughts on your own on how to stay ahead of the game and prevent yourself being burnt out on constantly striving for new ideas and challenges, do let me know.

I’ve been thinking about taking a break, but that will break the one promise I made to myself. Go a full year, posting a blog update on every one of those 365 days in the year.

As soon as our lives return to normality and our busy schedules become busy again, it may seem I may have to break that promise to myself sooner than I would like to …

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ISLAND: A New Tale in the Alternative

The Work of Island: Problems from an ever-changing line-up whilst working in dingy London studios …

… Comes a new tale in the alternative.

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From the fibres of the alternative rock scene – loosely translated as a much more tame beast as opposed to its distant relative of hard rockISLAND are a prestigious band gleaming with prospect.

Inspired from their distant adventures on the road, the band released their 2018 debut, Feels Like Air. Since then, they have kept themselves busy with European tours, stretching as far as the coast of North America, even. Whenever they have had time off the road, they’ve been knuckling down in the studio, creating joyous tales once more. In 2019, they released coveted EP, When We’re Still with Editors-inspired plateau, Just That Time of the Night.

Prior to all this however, it seemed that regardless of their reverent line-up, the name of ISLAND would prevail throughout as 2015 was the year when they such things to be true. With feelings of maturity and a hope filling the air, they released Girl in 2015. Who knew the beautiful simplicity of Stargazer would rise the band to new heights?

Bringing a completely new set of tools and brand to the wares of alternative music that seem simplistically beautiful in creation, they are bringing a fresh perspective to musical songwriting and ask for those to join the congregation.

Forged from the inspired thoughts due to their extensive time on the road, Feels Like Air, champions exactly that.

Music that is so effortless and seemingly made so emphatically, it is equally fair to listen every bit the same, too.

I’m sure those echoic guitars first thrilled the studio when they heard them.

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Feels Like Air

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Ride (a powerful album start-up)

Try (For fans of Grizfolk and Circa Waves)

The Day I Die (for fans of Editors and Radiohead)

Something Perfect

Interlude

Horizon (for fans of JAWS)

Moth

We Can Go Anywhere

God Forgive (empowering moments make it my favourite amongst the list)

Feels Like Air (self-titled makes it a close second)

Lilyflower (light acoustics settle the album to a close)

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Let’s Talk: When does good music turn bad?

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Let’s Talk: Discussing the Music

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This is a topical point of conversation that first came to me when I was listening to lostprophets. Again, I don’t know what caused me to fraternise with such music in relation to such a catastrophic individual that is Ian Watkins, but there I was. Listening to Rooftops and enjoying myself for a brief fleeting moment before I thought again about this band.

Another jarring thought comes to mind with this question when we essentially grow up. Telling sad truths has never been a thing I’ve wanted to do, but it’s true. When you turn 33, that is the age when you stop liking new music. An instant distaste crops up with all popular teen pop music. But, funnily enough, if you grew up with it in your own teen years, this music will more often, remain with you until your thirties. Whether we grow up, or merely grow out of music, you could essentially argue that the music your once loved and grew it up, will either be a bitter-sweet memory or music turned bad – depending on what is associated with that music.

So let’s talk … this is the question I propose to you – –

When does good music turn bad?

Is it hideous affiliations or rumours associated with the band?

Or is it just the music itself?

Do you have any proposing stories of music you once loved – but turned sour?

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If so, let me know!

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